PreSonus Blog

Hey! If you missed this incredible presentation, it’s no big deal. Because you can see it on YouTube. Or heck, just click that familiar little triangle-shaped “Play” button below.

We flew Briana in to Baton Rouge, assembled a killer band, and had them track a few songs using Rick’s monster rack of ADL 600 and ADL 700 preamps—because we can. EVERY channel of audio in this production was run through the ADLs.  How do you think it sounds?

Category PreSonus LIVE | 2 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



Riker

[This just in from three-time Grammy winning Producer/Engineer Warren "WAR" Riker! He's using using two ADL 700's on Anders Osborne's latest recording at Dockside Studio in Maurice, LA. He says...]

“Damn, these sound awesome on acoustic guitars! Can’t wait to start recording vocals!”

Warren working hard at Dockside, but we have more to come on this story in the coming weeks as production on this record continues. Stay tuned!

 

Category Artist | 0 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



Our friends at Sweetwater spent some time at our NAMM booth getting details on the StudioLive 32.4.2AI from Rodney, our European Product Marketing Manager and technocrat. Big thanks to both!



Category StudioLive 32.4.2AI | 0 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



[This just in from Mike Dawson, Engineer/Voice/Producer on The Adam Carolla Show!]

Hey PreSonus!

I wanted to share a bit about our use of the StudioLive 24.4.2 on our broadcast. It’s awesome to have all the built-in effects. I never know what’s going to happen at any given moment on the Adam Carolla Show. Debbie Gibson was a guest on our show during  her and Adam’s run on Celebrity Apprentice together.  She started singing “Billy, Don’t be a Hero,” by Bo Donaldson. I immediately mixed her mic into the reverb I’ve selected for solo vocal performances (always impromptu!)  and she sounded pretty bitchin’.  She looked at me through the glass and winked, saying something like “Hey, you’ve got an engineer that knows what he’s doing.” Adam joined in the song, and with the touch of a button they have perfect studio quality reverb on vocals. After the show, Debbie Gibson hugged me.

Most recently, David Alan Grier was doing a hilariously dirty Teddy Pendergrast impression. Again, in milliseconds, reverb is up and easily engaged and disengaged without having to fumble through auxiliaries and faders. This is a bad-ass piece of machinery. I use it in my own production studio, and even travel with it for on-site recording and engineering gigs.

The StudioLive console is so easy to set up for impromptu live performances in the studio. In the past few months, I’ve engineered and mixed live performances by Barry Zito and Kelley James, Susanna Hoffs and Hoobastank, and they all sounded like they were supposed to.

Damn good.

 

Category StudioLive 24.4.2 | 1 Comment »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



[This just in from Ghostfeeder, electro-rockers and FireBox enthusiasts from Rochester, NY.]59779_564662676885117_1231343093_n

For three years strong, my PreSonus FireBox has been a companion for Ghostfeeder on the stage as well as in the studio, and not once have we experienced artistic differences. The ‘Box is an undeniable asset when it comes to simplicity. When I was initially getting into recording for Ghostfeeder, I was a bit apprehensive about the amount of gear and technological know-how that seemed necessary to properly equip Ghostfeeder for self-sufficient recording. The fact that I literally just had to plug in the FireBox in to my computer in order to get great sound right off the bat pretty much squashed that apprehension. I was able to leave the diagnostics and troubleshooting to the online message boards catering to those who bought products made by the competition. As a result, every guitar, bass and vocal on every Ghostfeeder release has been recorded through the Firebox.

My preference for simplicity extends beyond the studio and into performance gear as well. My FireBox can push sound just as smoothly as it accepts it. It is an indispensable part of Ghostfeeder’s live presentation, pushing enough juice behind our backing tracks to fill any sound system without a hiccup, all while feeding our drummer a custom mix to his headphones. We house the Firebox in a custom-built tripod rack. It allows us to have our FireBox, our DMX light controller and our laptop all mounted onto one module for easily moving all of our technology onto and off of the stage with little fuss. The PreSonus Firebox is the unofficial fifth member of GhostFeeder.

ReverbNation
SoundCloud
Facebook
Youtube

Category Artist | 23 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



[This just in from Sonic Sense Pro Audio! They just got a hold of the new Eris monitors, and had this to say:]

Today Sonic Sense had a visit from our buddies Mark Stone and CJ Lewis from PreSonus. We were lucky enough to get first listen on PreSonus’ new Eris line of studio monitors. All of us here were VERY impressed. Stay tuned for video demos and comparisons!

 

Category Studio Monitors | 0 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



What do you suppose he’s planning for THIS rig?

Rick_ADL_800px

Category ADL 700 | 0 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



Check out this killer video from mecprosound over on YouTube! He just uploaded this tutorial on setting up the Akai MPC Renaissance controller to control transport in Studio One like a boss.

 

Category Studio One | 0 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



Studio-One-book[This just in from Bill Edstrom, Pro Audio Author and all-around gem of a man.]

Hey PreSonus!

I’ve done projects in just about every DAW on the market. To use most of these systems you need to be in a very technical frame of mind. About three years ago, I was looking for something simpler—something to get creative songwriting ideas out. That’s when I discovered Studio One. The workflow made sense to me and it helped me write.

As I got more interested in Studio One, I discovered anther great thing—a community of users that were amazingly helpful and enthusiastic. I started contributing to the PreSonus Forum with some free YouTube videos which lead to my work with Groove 3. I went on to create four volumes (24 hours worth!) of video training for Studio One.

When I started talking to Bill Gibson at Hal Leonard about some book concepts, I really wanted to do a Studio One book. I think they see the potential for this DAW because they have already published Larry the O’s book Power Tools for Studio One with a second volume on the way.

My book is designed as concise introduction to the core features of Studio One. I wrote it for the person that already has some experience with another DAW. The book content is really focused on getting up to speed with the software as quickly as possible. There are also 12 new videos included with the book covering some of the key concepts that would be tricky to explain in writing.

Why Studio One? Well, besides being great software, PreSonus has been amazing to work with. I have had the chance to meet Matthias and the PreSonus Software team at PreSonuSphere and NAMM and they have been very welcoming. The rest of the PreSonus team including Rick, Jonathan, Brad, and Jim have been friendly and great hosts in Baton Rouge. I also really enjoyed presenting to a group of Studio One enthusiasts as part of PreSonuSphere 2012 last year.

At first, I was recording with Studio One as a canvas for creativity. But I realized that I could produce music end to end without really needing to use other tools. Back in March 2010 I put together my first rather crude Studio One video called “Fun With PreSonus Studio One.” That video has 42,000+ views. I think the title sums up my experience with Studio One. It’s fun to use!

Regards,
Bill Edstrom

You can (and should) get Bill’s book from the following retailers:

Powell’s
Barnes and Noble
Amazon

 

Category Studio One | 2 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



From CowProd over on YouTube. Rage Against the Machine playing Zed’s Records in 1992 before they made it huge…

 

Category Just for Fun | 0 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard