PreSonus Blog

Mixer aficionados the world over could always stand to learn a new trick or two, and at the rate that technology changes, sometimes we all find ourselves with a little catching up to do. Good thing, then, that Alfred Publishing has recently released the StudioLive Mixer handbook, which has a little something for everyone. If you’re using one of the classic StudioLive mixers or the new AI mixers, you will find something of value as the book covers both! Furthermore, it’s broken down into a simple three-tier arrangement: a general overview, live sound, and studio recording—including a nice bonus chapter on mic placement.

You’ll also find info on getting the most out of using your StudioLive with external devices like your laptop and iPhone, feedback elimination, remote iPad control, and recording your shows.

Here’s a couple freebies to get ya hooked:

With the publication of this tome, renowned engineer/producer Bobby Owsinski has cemented his stature as a dyed-in-the-wires StudioLive expert. After all, he wrote the book on it, right?

Click on over to Alfred Publishing’s site to grab a copy today.

Category StudioLive 32.4.2AI | 0 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



The kind sports at Hero’s Last Mission put together this exceptional video describing their workflow with the StudioLive 16.4.2. They are using the board to its fullest in both the studio and onstage, taking advantage of features like QMix personal monitoring and scene recall for saving board settings appropriate to multiple venues. Furthermore, they record live shows to Capture and then mix later in Studio One!

Hero’s Last Mission is taking advantage of the full PreSonus solution. Are you?

Category StudioLive 16.4.2 | 0 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



Even a meager home studio is littered with more gains, trims, volumes, gazintas and gazoutas than one can know what to do with. All of this sequential amplification can lead to clipped gazintas, noisy tones, and, if you’re not careful, tinnitus. So how do you figure out all of your input and output levels?

Properly gain staging your recording devices is critically important, and only a little tricky.  Leave it to Gear Addicts to demystify it all—just for you!

Well, just for you and anybody with Internet access. But still. Worthwhile viewing.

Category StudioLive 16.4.2 | 0 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



The StudioLive mixers are an ideal choice for running audio for your theate productions!

StudioLive mixers are ideal for the theatre because they are easy to use, allow you to save and recall production scenes, and the integrated software tools allow anyone to run sound. This video demonstrates how school and community theatres can benefit from using a StudioLive to enhance their production and rehearsals.

Category StudioLive 32.4.2AI | 0 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



[This just in from Thomas Holmen, drummer for Infernal.]

Hi PreSonus!

How are you? I have made this little video showing one of my drum solos from Infernal, live in Denmark. 14 tracks from FOH were mixed in Studio One.  I like the sound of the drums, and I really do hope that you will find this homemade video interesting.
Turn up the volume and listen to my mix, and please let me know what you think!
All the best
Thomas Holmen

[Blogger's note: I think it sounds great, Thomas. Thanks! Dear readers: what do you think about Thomas' drum mix? Comment!]

 

Category StudioLive 16.4.2 | 1 Comment »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



[This just in from Sean Walker, Seattle audio engineer and boating enthusiast. He recently took his friends, and his StudioLive 16.4.2, for a spin out on Lake Washington during the city's annual Seafair festival. Oh, and he also brought his band, and remotely mixed the band's performance on the water while mixing via StudioLive Remote on his iPad. From a floating trampoline. Seriously. Pics follow.]

It’s August in Seattle, and that means two things: less rain than normal and our annual Seafair celebration! Seafair is a week-long celebration culminating on the first Sunday in August with the H1 Unlimited Hydroplane races and an air show over the race course on lake Washington! The race course is surrounded by a log boom on the outside perimeter to keep pleasure crafts from getting run over by a 200 MPH hydro. Now, being the festive sort, we often fill the log boom with boats and party like it’s Mardi Gras! This year, however, we outdid ourselves with the help of our friends at PreSonus, Audix, Sennheiser and QSC. This year, our client and I loaded a Yacht with a 6 Kilowatt generator, a PreSonus Studiolive 16.4.2, four QSC KW181 subs, four KW122 tops, and some K12s for monitors, and invited our friends in the fantastic cover band, The Herding Cats to THROW DOWN ON TOP OF THE YACHT!

Naturally, this presented a unique set of challenges. There were to be identical bow and stern PA rigs (you don’t want any survivors… I mean, anyone to miss the show), monitors for the band, and a wireless transmission to another yacht. So, we set up the speakers, ran power and signal, then ran a snake to the top of the vessel where the band would play as I mixed from inside the cabin. Thankfully for me, this was not my StudioLive’s first rodeo. Rather than the old guess-and-check method I’m used to when there is no proper FOH position, I got to relax on the floating trampoline behind the Yacht and mix the show, via StudioLive Remote on my iPad, iced tea in hand! If that isn’t a win, I don’t know what is! Also, the StudioLive’s ability to link Auxiliary sends to stereo made the wireless transmission to the other yacht a breeze!

The Microphones were all Sennheiser and Audix, except for an RE20 on the kick. Vocals all ran wirelessly. An E965 for Jon, who is the drummer/lead singer. E835’s were deployed for Mike and Rick’s backing vocals. Mike’s Fender Twin amp was miked with an E609 in the standard “Yeah, that’s just right” spot where the dust cap meets the cone. A DI was used for Rick’s bass to keep things “simple.” Since Jon thinks he’s some kind of Bonham, and drenches his drums with pitchers of water for an AWESOME spectacle during the bands Led Zeppelin melody, durable is the name of the game here. Snare and toms were Audix F-series with a Sennheiser E901 plate in the kick and an RE20 for kick out.

The day went off without a hitch and the band sounded fantastic! Most importantly, we had fun and that’s what this game is all about!

A HUGE thank you to Presonus, Sennheiser, Audix and QSC for making fantastic gear in both function and sound. We could not have pulled this off nearly as easily without their help!

The Herding Cats are Jon Bolton, Mike Mattingly and Rick Lovrovich. If you find yourself in the Seattle area, you owe it to yourself to catch them in action!

Sean Walker is a Freelance Audio Engineer in the Seattle area.

Category StudioLive 16.4.2 | 1 Comment »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



The StudioLive family of digital mixers have become a sonic solution for houses of worship around the globe. We recently compiled this great series of testimonials from live sound engineers who rely on the StudioLive for their events. Thanks much to everyone who had a hand in this!

For more on the StudioLive solution, click here.

Category StudioLive 24.4.2 | 0 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



[We decided it best to give some recognition to our more vocal advocates—and what better way than via a blog series?]

Who are you, where are you, and what do you do? 

Paul Peters, FOH/IEM (in-ear monitor) engineer, producer, songwriter, and performer. I’m also a PreSonus artist.
How were you introduced to PreSonus?
My experience with PreSonus started in 2008, when a church in Merritt Island, FL wanted to get a small compact console for their satellite campus.  I did research and loved the PreSonus StudioLive 16.4.2. I ordered the console, installed it, and began a love affair with PreSonus that is still strong. On multiple tours over the past five years, I was contacted by the band A Day To Remember in 2009, because the IEM system they were using failed.  I suggested the PreSonus 24.4.2.  They purchased the console and flew me to Ocala, FL to tweak it out for them.  They loved it, and I was soon hired to be their FOH/IEM engineer for two tours. After tens of thousands of miles, and countless shows, the mixer is still running strong.  Because of the quality and reliability, the PreSonus StudioLive family has been the first suggestion I make to touring bands, clubs, or houses of worship.  I have also been on tour with Sick Puppies, We Came as Romans, Otherwise, and Papa Roach.
What PreSonus software/hardware do you use and for what purpose?
Personally, I own a StudioLive 16.4.2.  I use it when I play clubs or when I mix other bands.  I purchased the mixer in 2010 and have yet to have anything go wrong with it.  I have also installed PreSonus StudioLive consoles in over 10 different venues including clubs, concert halls and houses of worship.
What’s so great about PreSonus, anyhow?
The functionality of the StudioLive consoles is where it truly shines. Great sound quality, comprehensive layout and portability makes the StudioLives great for any application.  The virtual sound check is an incredible tool. The WAV files from Capture rival most pro DAWs.  My favorite feature is Universal Control’s remote iPad mixing.  It has eliminated the need to pull an audio snake for a FOH position in just about every application.  Tweaking monitors and house is completely portable, and easy.  My iPad, router and StudioLive mixer are my best friends.
What are you working on now—or next?
Recent PreSonus adventures have been the A Day To Remember IEM mix, the Heritage FOH mix, and the Ridiculous Youth Conference in Panama City Beach.  I’m sure my next gig is right around the corner.
Where can our readers learn more about you online?

Category StudioLive 24.4.2 | 2 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard




[We decided it best to give some recognition to our more vocal advocates—and what better way than via a blog series?]

Who are you, where are you, and what do you do?

I’m Brian Busch—Owner and Lead Engineer for Diamond Entertainment.

How were you introduced to PreSonus?

I started reading reviews and keeping an eye on PreSonus after the release of the StudioLive 16.4.2. It was pointed out to me by Roger Blevins, the lead singer for Mingo Fishtrap. He has long been a fan of PreSonus preamps, which he uses in his studio. With his recommendation and after some research of my own, once the StudioLive 24.4.2 was released I snapped one up and have been using it ever since.

What PreSonus software/hardware do you use and for what purpose?

I own a StudioLive 24.4.2 mixing console attached to a Mac Mini that has Capture and Studio One. We record our shows. Mingo Fishtrap is about to go on tour, and we will be using Capture to record the tour for a live album later to be produced later in the year. I also use an iPad to remotely mix most of my shows with StudioLive Remote. Even when I am not mixing with the iPad, it is an awesome tool for EQing monitors. The Smaart Measurement Technology is great for finding crazy frequencies that show up in the middle of a show.

What’s so great about PreSonus, anyhow?

In a word – flexibility. In my business, being able to adapt to whatever situation is thrown at you is paramount. I constantly have to set my mixer up on the stage, or side stage, for instance, because the show we are playing is for a wedding, I can remotely mix without ruining any the pictures of the bride’s special day.

When on tour, we will mix the show through the StudioLive 24.4.2 and just send a left/right to the front of house. This helps us out because we never know what situation we are showing up to. It could be a club with an old 16-channel board (we need 22, minimum) or a festival with some unfamiliar digital console. However, using this board and my iPad, I can stand right out in the sweet spot of the audience and mix the show from there. Festival stages love this because we only tie up two channels on their snake.

I also like the solid punchy sound of the preamps. No other mixer I use delivers more. This is true especially for drums. I can make just about any drum kit sound like a million bucks with those preamps.

Where can our readers learn more about you online?

Right here:

https://www.facebook.com/DiamondEntertainmentAustin

www.diamondaustin.com

Category StudioLive 16.4.2 | 0 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



[We decided it best to give some recognition to our more vocal advocates—and what better way than via a blog series.]

Who are you, where are you, and what do you do?

Steve Savanyu. Hudson Ohio,  I am the educational services director at Audio-Technica and teach at Kent State University. I teach microphone and wireless workshops at universities around the country and have taught at all of the PreSounSphere events… In my spare time I operate Buford T. Hedgehog Productions, a local production company that does live sound, studio recording , live remote recording, video production and lights just for giggles. I also participate in really big events such as Presidential Debates, Papal visits, and Inaugurations….

How were you introduced to PreSonus?

Through a friendship with Rick Naqvi, at a church sound seminar where I was teaching a microphone class. I assisted with a live recording at the event where we used 3 FirePods aggregated together on my Mac laptop. It was a fun experience and we learned a lot. Ask Rick about hot patching into a non-transformer isolated 48-channel stage snake splitter. It made a big noise on a really expensive NEXO line array…. Oops.

What PreSonus software/hardware do you use and for what purpose?

Where shall I begin? I currently own 5 StudioLive 16.4.2’s, one StudioLive 24.4.2, and 1 StudioLive 16.0.2 which I use primarily for live gigs. I also have been known to carry the 16.0.2 out as the front end for remote tracking sessions using Capture. (I have recorded the orchestral score for two Kent State Student films this way). My original location rig is a FireStudio with 2 Digimax Pres to give me 24 inputs. (I multitracked a basketball game with it for an Audio Technica project. We were showing how different mics and positions affected game sound for broadcast.) In the studio I have a Central Station with remote for speaker management, and a FaderPort  which I use as a controller for the audio part of my video edit rig. I picked up an AudioBox 44VSL for location video work (tied into a MacBook Pro laptop). I run a legacy Pro Tools rig in the studio with a DIGI-003 interface (back when ProTools required Digi hardware) with DigiMax D8 mic pre. The band I work with uses two of the 16.4.2s and performs about four nights a week on average (in different locations). The ease of operation on the StudioLive console and the ability to save scenes makes it a snap for the band to use.

On the software side, I use Capture to record almost every live event we do. The low overhead of capture allows me to use some pretty basic computers to record up to 32 tracks via two linked StudioLive 16.4.2s. In the studio, I have been using Studio One Professional 2.5 as my main edit software. I like it, as it’s intuitive and has low computer processing overhead so it runs great on a laptop. As an experiment, I mixed a seven-song EP of a band I work with on a flight from LA to New York! I was burning out the CD as the flight attendant was saying power down your electronic devices for landing. Of course my Audio-Technica ATH-M50 headphones made accurate monitoring possible in the plane’s less-than-fancy mixdown environment.

I have dabbled with iPad control on my larger rig, but not implemented it completely due to the expense of buying seven iPads, computers and routers. I am looking forward to the StudioLive 32.4.2AI with its built-in networking. I can beta test… :)

 

What’s so great about PreSonus, anyhow?

First and foremost is the people! I have called Justin and Rick on weekends and evenings with questions and they always get back to me promptly. I have participated in both PreSonuSphere events and like the camaraderie of the entire PreSonus Family.

Second, is the products just work and sound good. They are intuitive to learn making it easy for me to train a band’s engineer on using a digital board. We like the fact the processing is built-in to the StudioLive consoles. The presets sound great, and make it easy to get a mix up even if you have never done sound for the band before. True story: Early on we did a gig for a band who was unfamiliar with the power of a digital console. It was an outdoor event so I had the 16.4.2 out front with the snake and a power cable for FOH stuff.  Their diva lead singer, who knew everything about sound and told me so, was being a pain in the butt.  He walked out to FOH, looked at the “smallish” console and said “dude where is your effects/EQ rack?” I hesitated for a moment and looked him in the eye and said: “Dang, I knew we forgot something…” The look on his face was priceless…

And third of course,  is the jambalaya…

Where can our readers learn more about you online? 

First and foremost, check out the Audio-Technica.com website. A-T makes great studio and live mics that pair up well with PreSonus hardware. Our new AT5040 with its revolutionary capsule design and “pure, simple signal path” would pair up well with the ADL 700 Channel Strip (hint hint, I have the mic…) Our Artist Series and Artist Elite live sound mics are second to none.

As for me, check out my website www.bufordthedgehog.com and visit me on Facebook. I try to post a FOH picture of every gig I do either on my page or the PreSonus user group page. I am on LinkedIn but don’t do the Twitter thing.

You can see some of my video work on the A-T YouTube channel as well as other audio companies’ YouTube channels. I have several published articles about doing audio for video and I am the audio expert on the FilmSkills online training series produced by Jason Tomuric.

I attend all of the major trade shows: NAMM, INFOCOMM, NAB, etc. and do microphone and sound workshops at universities, church conferences (with my good friend Doug Gould) and trade shows. You can’t miss my distinctive look…. just ask for the blonde guy!

 

Category VSL | 0 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard